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UIC News Tips
 
 

Office of Public and Government Affairs                    (312) 996-3456 / newstips@uic.edu

Week of Nov. 23, 2015

 
 
World AIDS Day Dec. 1
 
Contact: Sharon Parmet: (312) 413-2695 / sparmet@uic.edu

An estimated 4,300 people in Chicago are unaware that they are HIV positive, according to the Chicago Department of Public Health. UIC's Project HEAL, which has increased HIV testing in the UI Health emergency department from an average of 40 people per year to more than 6,500 people in the last 12 months, celebrates its one-year anniversary on World AIDS Day. Cammeo Mauntel-Medici, project coordinator, can speak on the importance of testing and her work in advocating for change in the AIDS Confidentiality Act, which now allows for more people to be more easily tested.

 
Talking to Children About Terrorism
 
Contact Sharon Parmet: (312) 413-2695 / sparmet@uic.edu

In the wake of recent terrorist attacks in Paris, adults may not know how to talk with children about the way the children are feeling. Marc Atkins, professor of psychiatry and director of the Institute for Juvenile Research in the UIC College of Medicine, provides the following tips to help parents talk to children about the attacks:

  • Answer questions honestly if children are old enough to understand
  • Maintain normal routines
  • Make sure children see that the parent is OK
  • Turn off the TV/Internet to limit exposure to alarming newscasts
  • Let children know they are safe and protected
 
Refugee Crisis - Countering ISIS Recruitment
 
Contact Sharon Parmet: (312) 413-2695 / sparmet@uic.edu

Dr. Stevan Weine, professor of psychiatry in the UIC College of Medicine, is an expert on the psychosocial effects of refugee status and on the challenges refugees face in the communities they migrate to.

Weine is also funded by the Department of Homeland Security to investigate methods to help counter efforts by ISIS and other extremist groups to recruit members in the United States. He says that such efforts need to focus on the community and bring together law enforcement, religious and community leaders to build trust, challenge misinformation, educate people, and more.

Weine is director of the UIC International Center on Responses to Catastrophes. His research focuses on the personal, familial, social, and historical dimensions of trauma and refugee migration. He was principal investigator of a National Institute of Mental Health-funded study of rescued Bosnian and Kosovar families in Chicago.

 
Racial Prejudice in Gun Policy Preferences
 
Contact Brian Flood: (312) 996-7681 / bflood@uic.edu

Racial resentment is a statistically significant and important predictor of white Americans’ opposition to gun control, according to a study by UIC researchers. Alexandra Filindra, UIC associate professor of political science, and Noah Kaplan, UIC visiting assistant professor of political science, found that the contemporary "gun rights narrative is color-coded" and the language of individual freedom is evocative of the white’s resistance to black civil rights that developed after World War II and into the 1970s. Filindra and Kaplan are available to discuss the study and how messages about gun control are communicated.

 
Syrian Crisis Not Similar to Holocaust
 
Contact Brian Flood: (312) 996-7681 / bflood@uic.edu

The Syrian refugee crisis has drawn comparisons with Jewish refugees fleeing the Holocaust. But UIC history professor Richard Levy cautions that the situations are radically different for various reasons, not limited to the amount of people fleeing, border and immigration laws, and economic conditions. Levy, a Holocaust historian, says a better comparison to current events is the mass exodus of Jews to North and South America as a result of the Russian pogroms of 1881, during which there were no restrictions placed on the migrant's place of origin, at least for Europeans.

 
Germany's Response to Refugees
 
Contact Brian Flood: (312) 996-7681 / bflood@uic.edu

Germany has stood out among its European counterparts for acceptance of Syrian refugees. In the early 1990s, Elizabeth Loentz, UIC associate professor and head of Germanic studies, taught German to unaccompanied minor refugees in Germany who arrived from the Balkans, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Loentz, who has studied transnational and migrant literature, is available to discuss Germany's role in the current refugee crisis and the evolution of its immigration, naturalization and asylum laws. 

 
 
Contact Brian Flood: (312) 996-7681 / bflood@uic.edu

A book co-edited by Dick Simpson, UIC professor of political science, features new material on matters such as Mayor Rahm Emanuel's tenure, efforts to boost Chicago's international profile, and race and class issues in the city. Simpson is available to discuss the book, “Twenty-First Century Chicago,” which incorporates scholarly articles with first-hand accounts, including speeches by politicians, news articles, memoirs and biographies, and research reports advocating change.

 
Teachers Union Rally
 
Contact Anne Ranallo: (312) 355-2523 / aranallo@uic.edu

The Chicago Teachers Union has been one of the most forceful voices nationally to promote anti-racist policies and funding mechanisms that stabilize urban districts, and to oppose school-to-prison pipeline policies and invalid assessment strategies, says Josh Radinsky, who teaches curriculum and instruction and plans to join today's CTU rally.

 
 
 
23, Monday | Pay what you can | Call: (312) 996-6068
Guest pianist Ivana Bukvich joins the UIC Orchestra for a concert featuring Mozart's "Adagio and Fugue, K. 546" and Benjamin Britten's "Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra." Javier Jose Mendoza conducts. 7:30 p.m. Merit School of Music, 38 S. Peoria St.
 
 
24, Tuesday | Pay what you can | Call: (312) 996-6068

The UIC Jazz Combos performs. 7 p.m. Jaks Tap, 901 W. Jackson Blvd.

 
 
24, Tuesday | Free | Call: (312) 996-6068

Performer and writer Arlene Malinowski offers an open master class for theatre students. Malinowski has taught acting and writing in theaters and colleges nationwide. Her students have been honored with Garland Awards, special recognition at fringe festivals in Edinburgh, New York, Atlanta, Chicago, LA Weekly nominations, Jeff Awards, and numerous "Critics Picks." Public welcome. 1 p.m. UIC Theatre, 1044 W. Harrison St.

 
 
30, Monday | Free | Call: (312) 413-3780

"Future of Chicago" lecture series talk by Toni Preckwinkle, Cook County Board president. Noon. Behavioral Sciences Building, Room 140, 1007 W. Harrison St. 

 
 
Thru Dec. 11 | Free | Call: (312) 996-9549

A Chicago Cultural Alliance exhibition and related programs that explore family traditions in Chicago’s Chinese-American and Ethiopian-American communities. Open Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.; and by appointment. K-12 guided tours can be scheduled Monday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - noon. UIC African American Cultural Center, Addams Hall, 2nd floor, 830 S. Halsted St.

 
 
Thru Dec. 18 | Free | Call: (312) 996-9549

Featuring prints and images from private institutions, health journals and popular media that explore how people of African descent have been represented in public health campaigns. Open Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.; and by appointment. Group and guided tours scheduled Monday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - noon. UIC African American Cultural Center Library, Addams Hall, Room 200, 830 S. Halsted St.